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Saturday, January 12, 2008

Chicken Stock

Making your own chicken stock is not only so much cheaper than buying it at the store, but so much healthier, too.  Most people don’t realize it, but when you make broth with bones you have a really good source of minerals, especially calcium, magnesium, and potassium.  In addition you get gelatin, which is a great digestive aid.  You get none of these things from commercial broth, but you will get unwanted things like MSG.   Making your own stock is so amazingly easy.  I have tried perfecting the art of broth for so many years now and have come to the realization that simpler is better.  I don’t worry about special herbs and seasonings or veggies, like carrots, celery and onion.  Most of the time I just put some chicken in a stock pot and cover with water.  How easy is that!  You can add any of those things you want, but don’t put yourself out. Here are a couple of things you will want to know before you do this.  One, the longer this cooks the better, so begin early in the day.  Second, you will want to chill it overnight before using it to skim off the fat (not because fat’s bad, but because soup with a lot of fat doesn’t have a good mouth feel), so make a day ahead. You can use any chicken parts you want as long as you have bones and some skin and the more cartilage you have, the more gelatin you will get.  Jewish women add chicken feet to their broth for this reason.  Now some sources say you can reserve the meat for other uses when done with the stock, but other sources say that the longer you cook the chicken the more flavor is drained.  I am frugal and if I make stock I know I will throw the chicken out so I use parts that I wouldn’t use otherwise.  My family eats a lot of chicken so I buy whole chickens for $.82/lb and cut the parts off that we want – I cut the breasts off for meals that call for boneless breasts and I cut the legs, thighs and wings off for other meals.  Compare that to strictly using boneless chicken breasts for $2.49/lb.  I am left with a carcass that has a decent amount of bones, a bit of meat on the back, a generous amount of skin, and the wing tips.  So I feel I’m getting my broth for free since it’s just the leftovers that I’m using for broth. If you roast chicken for dinner you can do the same thing, take off all the meat that you want to eat and reserve the carcass for broth.  Roasted chicken makes an especially yummy broth.  I mentioned this at Thanksgiving, for some reason turkey stock is even better than chicken stock, maybe because the turkey roasts for so much longer; it’s the brown skin that gives such a good flavor. Place your chicken parts in a large stock pot/dutch oven, one that holds at least 4 quarts of water with the chicken.  I simmer two chicken carcasses at a time and end up with 2 quarts of broth.  Cover chicken with filtered water and 2 tablespoons vinegar, an acidic medium is what leaches the minerals out of the bones.  This is also true in our bodies, when our acid/alkaline balance is too acidic, we lose minerals out of our bones.  What makes us so acidic?  Sugar is the big culprit, along with processed grains.  There is more to bone health than drinking your milk!  Don’t worry, acidic things we eat, like vinegar and citrus, don’t make our bodies acidic, on the contrary, they help to alkalinize us.  If you have kids at home, try this neat experiment.  Get a chicken bone (we used a leg bone from a roast chicken dinner) and try to bend it gently, notice how stiff it is.  Place it in a jar and cover with white vinegar.  Let the bone soak for 2-3 days and then replace the vinegar and let soak 2 more days.  After the 4th or 5th day of soaking, take the bone out and dry off.  Now try bending it, notice how rubbery it is.  The vinegar has dissolved the calcium in the bone leaving only the collagen, a rubbery substance.  We don’t want this happening to our bones in our body, that’s why it is SO important to eat right. Anyway, I digress.  So we covered the chicken with water and vinegar.  Bring to a boil and skim the foam that rises and discard.  Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 6 to 24 hours.  I start mine in the morning and let it go until about 10 o’clock that night.  I have heard that some people keep it in the crockpot overnight.  I tried this and wasn’t happy with the results.  A note on simmering – simmering is not turning the heat all the way down, it is a low heat, but you can still see little bubbles in the broth.  You will see the liquid evaporate; this is okay.  The more it reduces, the better it tastes.  I usually end up with 2 quarts, when I started with 4.  You can always reconstitute it with water, if you like. When you are done simmering you place a wire mesh strainer in a bowl and strain the broth.  Throw out the bones and meat.  (I put them back in the empty pan until they’re cool, I don’t want to melt my trash bag.)  Chill it and then skim the fat off the next day.  Your broth should be jelled; this means there is a lot of good gelatin in it.  At this point you can store it in the refrigerator or freezer.  It will keep for 3 days in the fridge, but you can keep it indefinitely if you reboil it every 3 days.  Some people will reduce it down further at this point and pour into an ice cube tray and freeze to save space.  Then when they need broth they just grab some cubes and add some water. Notice we didn’t use any seasonings.  You will want to salt this to taste when you use it.  Since it reduces down quite a bit it would be too salty if we salted at the beginning.  Feel free to add carrots, celery, onion, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaf, parsley, etc.  Just know that you don’t have to do this to get a quality stock.  I only add those other things if I’m going to make plain chicken noodle soup, for some reason it needs all the flavor it can get.  But if I’m making Gumbo or Chicken and Dumplings, for example, I don’t. The possibilities are endless here, there are so many soups that are easy to make at home, and with your homemade stock they will be better for you, soups like Chicken Noodle, Chicken and Dumplings, White Chili, Tomato Florentine, Gumbo, Cream of Broccoli, Sweet Potato, Minestrone, and Chicken Enchilada are some that come to mind.  Broth will add flavor to many dishes.  I personally use this stock to make rice pilaf and orzo risotto (a faux risotto) also and I have started drinking it daily just for it’s benefits.  It is so delicious and warms you on a cold winter day.

23 comments:

  1. Wonderful description! You have such a frugal use of your chicken. I mostly roast chickens and then save the carcasses (I am not as creative a cook as you.) My parents sometimes by rotisserie chickens from Sam's, and they always freeze the carcasses for me. I usually put about 6-8 carcasses into my big canner, along with celery, carrots, onions, LOTS of garlic (in the skins--I squeeze them out into the soup after it cooks all day), bay leaves, sometimes fresh parsley from the garden, and a generous splash of vinegar. I usually make plain chicken soup with the bulk of the stock, so it definitely needs the extra flavoring. I freeze it in 2 cup and 1 cup portions. Last week I froze 3 1/2 quarts and made a big batch of chicken barley soup with the stuff I didn't freeze. Yum! It is so great to have on hand. It makes me feel like I can make nearly anything, and we do so love soup in the wintertime.

    I would love it if you'd post your French onion soup recipe as a suggestion for how to use beef stock. Incredible stuff!

    :)
    Justine

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  2. Great article. I would add that it's important your chicken is all-natural, hormone free. The last thing you want when making stock is for all those impurities being liquifieed.

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  3. Yes, that is, of course, IDEAL, but I am also a BIG believer that we do what we can do, we are all about babysteps here. :) You many enjoy my Ladder of Health article to see what I think is IDEAL.

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  4. [...] I make my own chicken broth.  It is SO much better for you than store-bought and it will save you tons of money!!  I cannot [...]

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  5. [...] of fiber from the sweet potatoes, lentils, celery, and carrots, and plenty of minerals from the homemade chicken broth and celtic sea [...]

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  6. Since I'm new to all of this...really really cooking the best we can possible... the vinegar used in the making the chicken stock - can it be apple cidar vingar? I appreciate all your input greatly! =)

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  7. Yes,
    You can use apple cider vinegar, sorry I didn't specify. I only use white vinegar for cleaning. I use apple cider vinegar for cooking. I usually like to use raw vinegar (I like Bragg brand), but for this, you can use any. It's going to be cooked anyway.

    Hope this helps!

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  8. Actually, European cooks (Polish and Ukrainian grandmothers, Jewish households) use lemon.

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  9. Thank you for the idea of vinegar! I didn't have apple cider vinegar so I'm trying lemon juice. Great article too! And I think it is important to remember that some of us cant afford to be completely organic/hormone free. We are doing what we can by cutting out soda and junk food, drinking more water and cooking our own food instead of eating frozen processed stuff.

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  10. why do you throw the meat away after simmering??

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  11. When you cook it that long, the flavor is zapped. I use very little meat in my broth, it's mostly bones, so there's not much wasted. I buy whole chickens and cut off the breasts, legs, thighs, and wings, for meals. What's left I use for broth.

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  12. Just found this site - looks great. Is this concentrated or use as is?

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  13. It is for use as is. If you want to cook it down to save room in the freezer, feel free, and then mark it as concentrate so that you can add water later.

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  14. thank you very much for this article - very informative (digress all you like!) i try to shop organic when i can, but yes its expensive. Sometimes i find that game birds like pheasant or partridge are cheaper, so i compromise and use free range game birds. For making stock i usually throw in whatever veggies i have left over from the week - the inside bits of celery which i dont like to eat, onions, garlic (yum) and sometimes even a cooking apple to add a bit of sweetness. i feel like not only am i doing great things for myself, but i'm not wasting anything either! :)

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  15. Great write up, mahalo for the article! ('And comments too!) - Big Aloha!

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  16. great stuff and i like the way you make things so easy and uncomplicated, life should be like that.

    could you post some of the recipes you mentioned above please. thank you

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  17. thank's for the article, I LOVE it! this helps me a lot to make my chicken stock. thanks again and keep posting.

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  18. Great article. I'd also add that there are few things more refershing and heathy on a hot day than a cold glass of homemade chicken stock. I know it sounds crazy, but a few summers ago I was training for a marathon and started drinking cold chicken stock after my practice runs. It was amazing. The cooling effect is immediate plus all the vitamins, minerals and natural salt content makes it the perfect low sugar (maybe even no sugar?) sports drink. It basically kicks gaterade's @#!*% ! I follow the same no seasoning approach to my stock so, there aren't any spices/seasonings that might upset your stomach. I read somewhere that stock was considered the first "health" food, so this is both old school and hardcore!

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  19. Oh wow.. I'm going to try and do this stock for my homemade vegetable soup.. will let you know how i get on. What is a Quart in cooking terms? I only make a litre of soup at a time so not sure how much stock i should make?

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  20. A quart is almost the same as a litre. There are 4 quarts to a gallon. Hope that helps! :)

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